WELCOMING GUESTS
SINCE 1961

Founded by Howard Butt, Jr., in 1961, Laity Lodge has been welcoming guests to retreats designed to reawaken a sense of the sacred—the nearness and goodness of God in all of life—ever since. The Lodge is located deep in the Texas Hill Country, on the banks of the Frio River. We hope you will find our Canyon to be a place of extraordinary beauty. We also hope that you’ll find that the things we do together are really quite ordinary: conversing, singing, walking, praying, eating, and resting. Those few things that we believe contribute to a truly good life—a life of steady stewardship and love, lived among friends and before God.

 
 

THE MOST COMFORTABLE LIVING ROOM IN THE HILL COUNTRY

The Great Hall, our main meeting space, was built to be the “the most comfortable living room in the Hill Country.” That’s an important distinction to us. It means you are a guest in our home …
a place we love deeply and have prepared just for you.

 

“On my first visit to Laity Lodge, I knew it was a holy place. The high hills spoke of it. The river spoke of it. ... I don’t believe I have ever known a place as full of human kindness and openness and grace as I have found in virtually everyone I met there.”
~Frederick Buechner

 

WE DON'T HAVE
AN AGENDA FOR YOU

For decades we’ve opened every retreat with these words: "We have an agenda, but we don't have an agenda for you." This is your retreat. And though we craft retreats to serve you well at every turn, we trust you to engage with the program as you see fit.

 
 

OF THE PEOPLE

“Laity” comes from the Greek λαϊκός (laikos), and means "of the people.” Laity Lodge is built on the conviction that all people, in all places and occupations, are called to be witnesses—steadfast, caring visionaries of hope in a world of shadows.

 
 

THE LAITY LODGE SYMBOL

Originally designed in 1978 by Richard L. Casey with oversight from Howard E. Butt, Jr., the Symbol of the Congress of the Laity was reworked in 2013 and is used today exclusively as the program symbol for Laity Lodge. The symbol was originally described thusly—“…it is made up of four adjoining circles: the top circle stands unadorned, representing God; the right circle holds a square, symbol for earth; the bottom circle contains the triangle which stands for the spiritual world, triunity, and creativity; the left circle embraces the cross, reminder of God’s reaching to man in the person of Jesus Christ. Bordering the four circles is the architectural shape of the early Roman Senate where representatives discussed major issues face to face. The Congress of the Laity, too, was a gathering of important people discussing major issues within a Christian context of leadership through servanthood.”